Sun's out, (hot cross) buns out! Brits bask in sunshine across the UK
16th April 2022

Sun’s out, (hot cross) buns out! Brits bask in sunshine across the UK with temperatures set to hit 22C today – after 23.4C Good Friday scorcher

  • Temperatures hit 23.4C in St James’s Park in central London on Good Friday – the hottest day so far this year
  • It made London hotter than Mediterranean holiday favourite Athens (21C), Ibiza (17C) and Majorca (20C) 
  • Forecasters are expecting clear, sunny spells today after a hazy start with the mercury set to reach 22C

Brits will sizzle in the sunshine again today ahead of splendid Easter Sunday after experiencing the hottest day of the year so far.

The mercury hit 23.4C in St James’s Park in central London on Good Friday afternoon, the Met Office said, making it hottest day of the year so far – and warmer than California.

The new high beat the previous record of 20.8C set in central London on March 23 and at Treknow in Cornwall on March 25. 

Amid the record temperatures, Easter holiday destinations like Majorca, Ibiza and Greece will only have highs of between 16C and 20C.

Although today is expected to be slightly cooler, temperatures are still expected to reach 22C for sunbathers and staycationers in parts of southern and central England.

It comes as millions of drivers took to the roads at the start of a long weekend desperate to make the most of the Bank Holiday sunshine – with an estimated 22.48million journeys taking places over the four days.

Brits will sizzle in the sunshine again today ahead of splendid Easter Sunday after experiencing the hottest day of the year so far. Pictured: The sun rises over the farmers fields in Dunsden, Oxfordshire

Although today is expected to be slightly cooler, temperatures are still expected to reach 22C for sunbathers and staycationers in parts of southern and central England

The mercury hit 23.4C in St James’s Park in central London on Good Friday afternoon, the Met Office said, making it hottest day of the year so far – and warmer than California. Pictured: Sun-seekers flock to Brighton beach on first day of Easter holidays

Met Office meteorologist Steven Keates urged beach-goers to ‘stick on the sunscreen’ and drink plenty of water to protect against higher-than-average UV levels.

The strength of UV rays could hit 6, which is considered ‘high’ on the Met Office’s index. This increase has been caused by slightly depleted stratospheric ozone, which helps protect Earth from the rays, he said.

Many parts of the country will see clear, sunny spells despite a cloudy start to the day in some areas.

More widely, some regions will reach the low 20Cs while parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland will reach the mid-to-high teens. Some central and western areas could see some cloud earlier in the day with mist and fog patches inland at first.

Met Office meteorologist Simon Partridge said: ‘It will be a fairly cloudy start to the morning before developing into a rather fine and sunny day on the most part.

‘Areas in the central and southern England, such as the West Midlands, are most likely to reach the low twenties.

‘It will then become gradually cooler going into Sunday, with showers in Scotland and Northern Ireland, while most other areas should remain pleasant.’

More widely, some regions will reach the low twenties while parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland will reach the mid-to-high teens.

It comes as millions of drivers took to the roads at the start of a long weekend desperate to make the most of the Bank Holiday sunshine – with an estimated 22.48million journeys taking places over the four days

Met Office meteorologist Simon Partridge said: ‘It will be a fairly cloudy start to the morning before developing into a rather fine and sunny day on the most part’

Some parts, mostly central and western areas, could see some cloud earlier in the day with mist and fog patches inland at first.

Forecasters say Easter Sunday will be cooler, although probably drier than Saturday, with showers confined mainly to the north and west ahead of a wetter Monday.

The Met Office forecast describes conditions for the next week as ‘increasingly warm’ with ‘sunny spells Wednesday interspersed with cloudier periods and scattered showers. Thursday and Friday largely dry and bright. Morning mist and fog patches likely, slower to clear around coasts.’

The outlook from Friday onwards currently reads: ‘It is likely to turn dry and become generally much more settled, though perhaps rather cloudy, in the south, with lighter winds through to the end of this period. Temperatures are expected to be above average, and warm at times for the south.’

It had led bookmaker Ladbrokes to slash the odds on a record hot Easter to 5-2.

Spokesman Alex Apati said: ‘At last it looks as though Brits will have something to smile about on the weather front, with a record-breaking Easter scorcher potentially on the cards.’

Delays are expected to continue following Thursday’s getaway travel chaos – as well as passengers at airports and train stations left waiting for hours in long queues. 

Many reported hour-long waits at Manchester and Birmingham airports, while dozens of British Airways and easyJet flights were cancelled at Heathrow.

Meanwhile, those at London St Pancras said they were standing in long queues for services to Europe on Thursday morning.

Rail passengers have also been warned of further delays as Network Rail carries out 530 engineering projects costing a total of £83million over the weekend.

These include the closure of the West Coast Main Line between London Euston and Milton Keynes for four days from Good Friday due to upgrades of the existing line and HS2 work.

Parts of the railway between Birmingham International station and Coventry will also be closed, as will lines around Crewe station.

Dover-Calais sailings by P&O Ferries were also still suspended as of Thursday night, which caused large queues of lorries forming on roads approaching the Port of Dover throughout the day.

On top of all the travel disruption, supplies of petrol and diesel at filling stations in some areas of the country have been at around half their usual level as the UK’s travel network comes under pressure.

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