New evidence about Marilyn Monroe's death to be revealed in new series
15th October 2020

Could new evidence in Marilyn Monroe’s death prove she was murdered? Cold case docu-series is set to unveil new information that ‘narrows the circle of perpetrators’ in her 1962 ‘suicide’

  • ZDF Enterprises announced that it will be working on a docu-series that will reinvestigate the death of Marilyn Monroe whose body was found August 5, 1962
  • The actress was discovered in bed with empty bottles of pills around her room 
  • After brief investigation, LA police concluded that her death was ’caused by a self-administered overdose of sedative drugs’ and declared her death a ‘suicide’
  • But Jack Clemmons, the former officer who found her, has previously said that he believed the ‘scene seemed staged’ when he arrived to her residence 
  • His theory was one of several, including claims of mafia revenge and CIA assassination, that has prompted investigators to take a closer look at the case
  • In a press statement, ZDF Enterprises said the series titled, Cold Case: History, has already uncovered new evidence using state-of-the-art forensics  

A new cold case docu-series is set to unveil new information that ‘narrows the circle of possible perpetrators’ in the 1962 death of Marilyn Monroe that was ruled a ‘suicide’. 

The actress died at her Los Angeles home on August 4, 1962. Her body was found on her bed by a responding officer, who also discovered empty bottles of pills, prescribed to treat her depression, littered around the room. 

After a brief investigation, Los Angeles police concluded that her death was ’caused by a self-administered overdose of sedative drugs’. They declared her death a ‘probable suicide’. 

But Jack Clemmons, the former officer who found her, has previously said that he believed the ‘scene seemed staged’ when he arrived.

His theory was one of several, including claims of murder, mafia revenge and CIA assassination plots, that has prompted investigators to take a closer look at the case. 

In a press statement, ZDF Enterprises announced that the company, in partnership with Story House Production, ZDF and Arte, will be working on a new docu-series titled, Cold Case: History, that has already uncovered new evidence. 

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New evidence surrounding the death of Marilyn Monroe (left and right) is set to be revealed in a new documentary series that delves deep into the biggest crimes in history using state-of-the-art forensics and archaeological methods

Monroe died at her Los Angeles home on August 4, 1962. Her body was found on her bed by a responding officer, who also discovered empty bottles of pills (pictured), prescribed to treat her depression, littered around the room

After a brief investigation, Los Angeles police concluded that her death was ’caused by a self-administered overdose of sedative drugs’. They declared her death a ‘probable suicide’

The company said a team will delve deep into some of the biggest crimes in history using state-of-the-art forensics and archaeological methods. 

Ralf Rueckauer, Vice-President ZDF Enterprises said in the statement: ‘Developing this series has been an exciting journey with each episode unravelling a mystery. 

‘It’s been fascinating to see modern day forensics at work dispelling age old theories, particularly in the case of Marilyn Monroe, where we have unearthed new evidence and testimony.’

Rueckauer didn’t elaborate on the nature of the new evidence and a DailyMail.com request for comment to ZDF Enterprises was not immediately returned Thursday morning. 

According to the statement, one of the episodes shows the discovery of ‘new evidence, narrowing the circle of possible perpetrators’. 

In addition to reinvestigating Monroes’ death, a team will also look into the Medici Case, where two sons were slain in a struggle for power. 

The six-part series will go even further back in time, 3,000 years ago, when Pharoah Ramses III was violently killed by his own kin. 

The series also looks at the death of prostitute Rosemarie Nitribitt in 1957, who was found hanged in her luxury apartment. 

Monroe with fellow actor and former boyfriend Marlon Brando, with whom she planned to set up an independent film production unit

Cold Case: History will go into production with Story House this fall, but it isn’t the first series to look into Monroe’s mysterious death. 

In August 2019, Fox News premiered its final episode of Scandalous: The Death of Marilyn Monroe. 

The episode explored how former officer Clemmons believed that the ‘scene seemed staged’ when he arrived on August 5, 1962. 

 Cold Case: History will go into production with Story House this fall, but it isn’t the first series to look into Monroe’s mysterious death

Gary Vitacco-Robles, the author of Icon, explained that Clemmons never documented the allegations he made concerning the possibility that something was off about Monroe’s death.

Footage from an interview years after the actress committed suicide shows Clemmons describing how her body had been ‘placed’ on the bed she was discovered in.

Most notably, Clemmons highlighted that he had not observed any cups in the room that could have alluded to the fact that Monroe had reportedly taken dozens of pills to kill herself.

A photograph of the scene does show a cup believed to have been part of a series of 12 that the star purchased in Mexico. Vitacco-Robles noted that the collector who now owns the ‘vessels’ reported that one was missing, believed to have been taken in by police for evidence.

The docu-series also highlighted that Clemmons noted that he saw housekeeper – Eunice Murray – washing something in the washing machine when he arrived, which he noted as ‘suspicious’.

‘The implication is that she was destroying evidence,’ Vitacco-Robles explained. ‘As the first responding officer, he did not further investigate what she was washing. He also did not issue any reports regarding this suspicion.

‘A full inventory of Marilyn’s estate was completed at the time of her death. A washer and dryer are not indicated in that inventory.’ 

Monroe with singer and actor Frank Sinatra, who she dated for several months in 1961

Monroe with her second husband, baseball star Joe Dimaggio, who remained devoted to her until the end

Clemmons’ credibility was drawn into question, however, when he was forced to resign from the LAPD in the 1960s after he and three others claimed that Republican Senator Thomas Kuchel had been involved in a homosexual sex act.

The officer’s claims hit their mark and have been used to support countless theories about Monroe’s death, decades later.

The theories helped elevate the mystery and status of Monroe, inspiring countless fans to emulate the actress.

‘When Marilyn died the fandom took over,’ the docu-series states. ‘Sex sells that’s a fact and people love to believe there was more going on.’

Monroe had been unable to work for six months in 1961 due to a series of physical and mental health problems.

She dated Frank Sinatra for several months that year and rekindled a friendship with her ex-husband and baseball star Joe DiMaggio, who was helping her get back on her feet.

Mysterious box of Marilyn Monroe documents found at UCLA and sealed until 2039 could prove she was MURDERED by her psychiatrist, claims private investigator 

Earlier this year it was reported that a box of Marilyn Monroe’s documents that were sealed until 2039, could prove she was murdered by her obsessed psychiatrist.

The claim was made by private investigator Becky Aldrige who found ‘Box 29’ stored at UCLA’s library where it will remain sealed to the public for another two decades, despite a list of contents showing it contains a trove of files about Monroe. 

The papers belonged to Dr Ralph Greenson, who found her body and who is suspected by some of administering the barbiturate overdose which killed her in 1962. 

Aldrige claims that Greenson killed Monroe after she threatened to reveal affairs she’d had with the Kennedy brothers.


The official account says Marilyn Monroe was found dead by Dr Ralph Greenson (left) but private detective Becky Aldrige believes a sealed box of his papers holds answers and that he administered a fatal injection that killed her

‘I have always believed Marilyn Monroe was murdered,’ Aldrige wrote. 

‘If you look at all of the stories, books, testimonies, and even evidence then there is no reason that Marilyn Monroe’s death certificate should not be changed from probable suicide to murder.’

Aldrige opened a petition asking for the finding of ‘probable suicide’ to be struck from Monroe’s death certificate and for the death to be re-investigated as a homicide. 

She has also asked that the Attorney General speak to two people who she says are alive today and who were never asked to give a statement but ‘were present when Marilyn Monroe took her last breath’.

They are LAPD Sgt Marvin Iannone, later promoted to chief of the Beverly Hills Police Department, and Patrica Newcomb, Monroe’s friend.

According to Aldrige, Newcomb left the country after Monroe’s funeral in 1962 and traveled through Europe for six months.

Aldrige claims that Monroe’s housekeeper Eunice Murray said she became concerned about the light being on in the star’s bedroom (pictured: Monroe’s home in Brentwood) and called Greenson who broke into the room in the early hours of the morning 

Meanwhile she claims that Iannone dismissed the other officers from Monroe’s home on Helena Drive, Brentwood, on the day the actress died.

Aldrige says ‘time is running out’ because Iannone is now 83-years-old and Newcomb is 88.

There have long been conspiracy theories surrounding Monroe’s death. The official account says Monroe was found dead by Dr Greenson who broke into her bedroom after being called to the home by the housekeeper in the early hours of the morning.

Monroe had died from acute barbiturate poisoning as a result of an overdose of chloral hydrate and pentobarbital.

Due to well-documented bouts of depression and prior overdoses a finding of ‘probable suicide’ was made by the coroner.

However, investigators like Aldrige believe Monroe’s alleged affairs with the Kennedy brothers, John F. Kennedy – then President – and his brother Bobby, could provide a motivation for Greenson being asked to give her an overdose.

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