Muscle-bound chimp ‘four times stronger than humans’ shows why we pray Planet of the Apes NEVER happens
3rd December 2018

The pumped-up chimpanzees – who all suffer from the hair-loss condition alopecia – show just how ripped the burly beasts actually are.

It's no wonder biologists say the aggressive jungle creatures are at least FOUR TIMES stronger than their human "cousins".

Chimps are considered the closest living relative of humans, sharing between 95 to 98 percent of the same DNA.

However, when it comes to muscular strength there really is no comparison between the two, say wildlife experts.

And if it ever came to a one-on-one fight there would be only one winner, said Steve Ross of Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo.


When they fight "it's the closest thing we know to human warfare," said Ross, director of the Study of Conservation of Apes.

"Chimps are incredibly strong and fast so humans are easily overpowered."

The apes are in fact at least four times as strong as humans, according to biologist Alan Walker, formerly of Pennsylvania State University.

And scientific research suggests the difference in strength between the two is down to how well the muscles perform.

In chimps, the muscle fibres closest to the bones – deemed to be the source of strength – are much longer and more dense.

This means a chimp is able to generate more power using despite using the exact same range of motion, Ross said.

However, unlike humans theyhave a lot less control over how they use their muscles – so use more strength than necessary.

And what is even more worrying is the animals are know to declare "war" on other animals will other primates for food.

Research from primatologist Jane Goodall showed chimps have "an appetite" for killing rivals, "akin to predation".

In 2016,  footage filmed at Twycross Zoo, in Atherstone, showed the moment two 'naked apes' took on 12 others.

The ripped chimps were filmed chasing and fighting with the others while screeching and grinding their teeth.

Scientists believe alopecia can be induced in chimpanzees due to stress or trauma, which can also happen to humans.

On Saturday, we reported how a muscular breed of bull have sparked an internet 'roid rage' row.

Belgian Blues have a naturally occurring mutation called "double-muscling" – which turns them into beefcakes.

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