London phone box with its own electricity supply on market for £45,000
7th July 2022

Iconic red London phone box near Kensington Palace with its own electricity supply goes on market for £45,000 – more than the price of two-bed town-house in County Durham

  • The red kiosk for sale is on Church Street in upmarket Kensington, west London
  • It is just 3ft deep and wide and 8ft 3ins high but is classified as a Listed Building
  • For less than its guide price you could buy a family house in Shildon, Co Durham
  •  There are houses with two bedrooms there for as little as £30,000

A phone box in a wealthy London street is on the market for £45,000 – more than the price of a two-bed house in County Durham.

The iconic red kiosk for sale is in upmarket Kensington, west London, close to Prince William and Kate Middleton’s home Kensington Palace as well as Buckingham Palace. 

It measures just 3ft deep and wide and 8ft 3ins high. 

Yet the K6 box – which dates back to the 1930s – is connected to an electricity supply, which means it could be converted into a place to run a business.

It is even classified as a Listed Building.

A phone box in a wealthy London street is on the market for £45,000 – more than the price of a two-bed house in Britain’s most affordable town to live

The phone box is very close to Prince William and Kate’s home Kensington Palace as well as Buckingham Palace

The listing for the iconic red kiosk, which has a guide price of £45,000

But for less than the guide price you could buy a family, terraced house in Shildon, Co Durham.

There are houses with two bedrooms there for as little as £30,000 and several currently on the market for between £40,000 and £45,000.

The average property price in the town is just £71,000 making it the cheapest place in the UK to live.

 The phone box is being sold Bid X1 and the ‘property’ summary reads: ‘Own an iconic piece of British heritage located in prime Kensington.

‘Run your own business, advertising potential or alternative uses STTP.

‘Electricity is connected.’

The listing continues: ‘These historic listed ‘K6’ red phone box or ‘Jubilee’ kiosks, commemorating the Silver Jubilee of the coronation of King George V.

You could buy this family, terraced house in Shildon, Co Durham for the same price as the phone box

There are houses with two bedrooms in Shildon, Co Durham for as little as £30,000 and several currently on the market for between £40,000 and £45,000. The average property price in the town is just £71,000 making it the cheapest place in the UK to live

‘These boxes are 8’3′ high and 3’ square.

‘They were originally designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, who also designed Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral, Battersea Power Station and Bankside Power Station now Tate Modern.

‘Historic England have listed to preserve these iconic red kiosks, and many have transformed them to coffee shops, libraries, flower shops, museums, bakeries, and defibrillators.’

This two-bedroom house located in Britain’s most affordable town to live is on the market for cheaper than the phone box on the wealthy London street

It continues: ‘Kensington is an affluent district in the West of central London.

‘The district’s commercial heart is Kensington High Street, running on an east-west axis. Kensington Church Street is a shopping street in Kensington designated the A4204, and traditionally known for it art and antiques shops.

‘The telephone kiosk is located on the east side opposite its junction with Dukes Lane.

‘You own the kiosk and can resell at any point, but it is heritage site, so cannot remove them or alter the exterior. The kiosk is registered as a Listed Building at Historic England.’

Take a look at some of these delightfully dotty ideas for obsolete phone boxes 

Telephone booths have become increasingly obsolete with calls made from them down by 90 per cent over the past decade as mobile phone use continues to surge. 

BT began offering them up for ‘adoption’ by local communities across England in 2008 and more than 5,800 neglected boxes have been converted into everything from plant nurseries to book exchanges.

Residents of Shepreth, Cambridgeshire, opened the world’s teeniest pub in their local phone box, complete with wooden bar, beer keg, pewter tankards and an agreeably cheery barmaid.

But locals of Kingsbridge, Devon, took a different path when they  opened the world’s smallest disco in 2011, complete with lights, glitter ball and music system.

Others include art galleries, miniature coffee shops, tourist information centres, patisseries and log stores. 


Residents of Shepreth, Cambridgeshire, opened the world’s teeniest pub in their local phone box (left) and what could be the world’s smallest art callery in Settle, North Yorkshire (right)

Locals of Kingsbridge, Devon, took a different path when they opened the world’s smallest disco in 2011, complete with lights, glitter ball and music system


A colourful, flower-filled display at an adopted telephone booth in Leeds (left)  and Umar and Alona Khalid with their cafe in Hampstead, North London (right)

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