Great white shark bites diver’s kayak and leaves two teeth behind

Truly jaw-dropping! Great white shark leaves behind two VERY clean teeth after chomping into a scuba diver’s kayak in California

  • A great white shark bit into San Diego diver Danny McDaniel’s kayak near Catalina Island roughly 50 miles off the coast of southern California on Saturday
  • McDaniel’s friend, John Chambers, watched the scene unfold from 25 feet away
  • The shark’s teeth got stuck in the body of McDaniel’s craft
  • He kept them as souvenirs before sharing photos of them on Facebook
  • Local marine scientists say about a dozen great white shark encounters have taken place near Catalina Island this year

A great white shark gave two California scuba divers a pair of pointy souvenirs as mementos after taking a bite out of one of the men’s kayaks over the weekend.

San Diego resident Danny McDaniel and his diving partner John Chambers were kayaking near Ship Rock at Camp Emerald Bay off the coast of Catalina Island in the Pacific Ocean on Saturday when McDaniel says he felt something hit his vessel.

Initially he thought it was friend’s kayak, but he turned around to see the head of a great white shark nudging the end of his nautical craft. 

‘I saw the snout of the shark over the back of the kayak. Then I followed the snout up and there’s a giant, immense body off to the right side of the boat,’ McDaniel told the Los Angeles Times.

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San Diego resident Danny McDaniel (right) and his diving partner John Chambers (left) were kayaking near Ship Rock at Camp Emerald Bay off the coast of Catalina Island in the Pacific Ocean on Saturday when a great white shark bit into McDaniel’s vessel

The shark’s teeth got stuck in the body of McDaniel’s craft and dislodged from the fish’s mouth. The force from its powerful bite caused McDaniel’s kayak to spin 180 degrees

Chambers was in his own kayak about 25 feet away as the scene played out.

He yelled at McDaniel, telling him to hit the shark on head to drive it away.

Moments later the shark sank its teeth into McDaniel’s kayak, leaving two of them behind before swimming away.

The force from the bite lodged the shark’s teeth into the craft’s plastic and caused it to spin 180 degrees, which McDaniel theorizes dislodged the jagged incisors.

The teeth were roughly two inches long, which means the shark they belonged to was about 19 feet long.

About a dozen great white shark encounters have been reported so far this year around the island, which sits about 50 miles of the coast of southern California (file photo)

The diver’s fitness tracker, which monitors his heart rate, allowed him to mark the precise moment of the harrowing encounter.

‘My heart jumped at 4:30 exactly, about 150 yards west from Ship Rock,’ he said.

The teeth were roughly two inches long, which means the shark they belonged to was about 19 feet long.

Sharks have multiple rows of teeth in their mouths, which are pushed forward to replace incisors pulled out after a major bite.

McDaniel took photos of the teeth he obtained, using his hand and a dollar bill to give viewers on his Facebook page a better idea of their size.

McDaniel took photos of the teeth he obtained, using his hand and a dollar bill to give viewers on his Facebook page a better idea of their size

Marine biology professor Chris Lowe, who serves as director of the Shark Lab at Cal State Long Beach, said the shark that attacked McDaniel has been seen several times near Catalina Island over the last two weeks.

About a dozen great white shark encounters have been reported so far this year around the island, which sits about 50 miles of the coast of southern California.

‘We should always be thinking there may be sharks here — but that doesn’t necessarily mean we should be scared,’ Lowe told the L.A. Times. ‘This is the new normal. We have to share the ocean with them.’

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