Coronavirus daily cases FALL by 6% in a week to 30,301
2nd October 2021

Coronavirus daily cases FALL by 6% in a week to 30,301 and deaths drop by six to 121

  • Department of Health bosses posted 30,301 new coronavirus cases today, down 6.7 per cent on last Saturday
  • Number of people falling victim to the disease is continuing to fall, with 121 new deaths recorded today
  • Hospitalisations caused by the virus also continued to drop off, with 768 people admitted on Monday

Britain’s Covid cases are starting to fall again, with new daily infections dropping week-on-week today for the third day in a row.

Department of Health bosses posted 30,301 new coronavirus cases today, down 6.7 per cent on the 32,468 recorded last Saturday.

And the number of people falling victim to the disease is continuing to fall, with 121 new deaths within 28 days of a positive Covid test recorded today.

This was down 4.7 per cent on last Saturday’s total of 127 and marked the sixth day in a row fatalities have fallen. 

Meanwhile, hospitalisations caused by the virus also continued to drop off, with 768 people admitted on Monday — the latest date data is available for. It was down 3.3 per cent on the week before.

The figures come after health secretary Sajid Javid today said care home workers who refuse to take the Covid vaccine should ‘get out and get another job’.

In a stern warning to vaccine refuseniks, Mr Javid said those working in care home with some of the most vulnerable people in the country ‘should get vaccinated’.  

He also brushed off appeals from providers to ‘pause’ the legal requirement for staff in England to be fully vaccinated by November 11, amid warnings some homes will be unable to cope if workers are forced to leave.

It comes after NHS workers hit out against ‘blunt instrument’ plans to make Covid jabs for staff compulsory by winter, with doctors and health service unions warning the policy could push out key staff ‘at a time we can least afford it’ and lead to discrimination.

Worldwide deaths related to Covid surpassed 5million on Friday, with unvaccinated people particularly exposed to the virulent Delta strain.

The variant has exposed the wide disparities in vaccination rates between rich and poor nations, and the upshot of vaccine hesitancy in some western nations.

More than half of all global deaths reported on a seven-day average were in the US, Russia, Brazil, Mexico and India.

While it took just over a year for the death toll to hit 2.5million, the next 2.5million deaths were recorded in just under eight months, according to a Reuters analysis.

An average of 8,000 deaths were reported daily across the world over the last week, or around five deaths every minute. But the rate has been slowing in recent weeks.

There has been increasing focus in recent days on getting vaccines to poorer nations, where many people are yet to receive a first dose, even as their richer counterparts have begun giving booster shots.

More than half of the world has yet to receive at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, according to Our World in Data.

The World Health Organization this week said its COVAX distribution programme would, for the first time, distribute shots only to countries with the lowest levels of coverage.

Co-led by the WHO, COVAX has since January largely allocated doses proportionally among its 140-plus beneficiary states according to population size.

 

 

It comes as: 

  • A mother whose 15-year-old daughter died from Covid on the day she was due to be vaccinated warned of children being too ‘blasé’ about the virus as she paid tribute to her ‘beautiful’ and ‘courageous’ girl;
  • An anti-vaxxer mother who was hooked on conspiracy theories died after admitting not getting the jab was the worst mistake of her life;
  • Worldwide deaths related to Covid surpassed 5million, with unvaccinated people particularly exposed to the virulent Delta strain;
  • Five England international footballers refused to have a coronavirus vaccine — threatening their places in the World Cup squad;
  • Sajid Javid urged Tube passengers to ‘put your masks back on’ as a quarter admitted they no longer use them;  
  • One in 20 children in England were infected with coronavirus on any given day last week, official data found; 
  • Councils told schools to bring in a suite of stricter Covid curbs in response to rising infections among pupils; 
  • Rates of depression in Britain are starting to fall after shooting up in the Covid pandemic, official data showed.

A further 17 coronavirus deaths have been reported in Scotland in the past 24 hours, figures show.

Statistics published by the Scottish Government on Saturday also reveal 2,515 new cases of Covid-19 have been recorded.

It means the death toll under this daily measure – of people who first tested positive for the virus within the previous 28 days — now stands at 8,665.

A total of 965 people were in hospital on Friday with recently confirmed Covid, down from 983 on Thursday, while 66 people were in intensive care, up one.

Overall, 4,199,724 people have had their first dose of vaccine, with 3,843,000 having had both. 

Speaking on the BBC Radio 4 Today programme this morning, Mr Javid said people refusing the vaccine ‘shouldn’t be in our care homes’.

He said: ‘If you want to work in a care home, you are working with some of the most vulnerable people in our country and if you cannot be bothered to go and get vaccinated, then get out and go and get another job.

‘If you want to look after them, if you want to cook for them, if you want to feed them, if you want to put them to bed, then you should get vaccinated.

‘If you are not going to get vaccinated then why are you working in care?

‘If you think about your elderly relatives you might have in care homes, and the idea that someone wants to look after them and they don’t want to take a perfectly safe and effective vaccine that has been approved by our regulators, been used all over the world, because somehow they have got some objection to this vaccine, then really, honestly, they shouldn’t be in our care homes.

‘They should go and get another job. I am very clear on that.’

Mr Javid brushed off appeals from providers to ‘pause’ the legal requirement for staff in England to be fully vaccinated

England squad vaccine crisis as FIVE stars refuse jab 

Five England international footballers are refusing to have a coronavirus vaccine – threatening their places in the World Cup squad.

Three senior team members are reportedly among the rebels who believe they are too healthy to suffer Covid or have been pressured by their wives.

One is said to have brazenly declared he was too ‘young and fit’ to be negatively affected by the virus.

Meanwhile another reportedly believes the anti-vaxxer ‘conspiracy theories’ about the jab.

The rest of the players are understood to have been ‘pressured’ not to get the jab by their wives or girlfriends who are against the vaccine.

It will come as a huge blow for England boss Gareth Southgate as World Cup organisers plan to ban all unvaccinated players from Qatar next year.

The Premier League is also struggling to clamp down on stars not taking the vaccine, with almost two-thirds of top-flight players yet to be fully jabbed and many refusing altogether.

Club officials are complaining dressing rooms have been ‘polluted’ by senior players spreading conspiracy theories involving Bill Gates, infertility and the power of vitamins. 

The health secretary is set to roll out plans to make Covid vaccination a requirement for all members of NHS staff next month.

It is believed by ministers that mandatory jabs for all NHS workers would help restrict the spread of the virus within hospitals and could ‘save lives’.

However NHS staff fear the plans could spark a mass exodus of healthcare employees.

Nadra Ahmed, chair of the National Care Association, has urged the Government to put back the November 11 deadline for staff to have both jabs, saying it will have a knock-on effect on the NHS if homes have to reduce resident numbers.

Ms Ahmed said care homes have already overcome significant resistance among staff to the vaccines.

In November last year, shortly before the vaccine programme launched, she said just 40 per cent of staff had said they would get it.

But 86 per cent of staff are now fully vaccinated, she said.

She told Today: ‘We are not anti-vaccine. What we are saying is we needed a bit more time to get people where they needed to be.’ 

She said that without a delay to the deadline, the consequences for care homes and for the wider health sector will be severe.

‘The situation is chronic now with staffing and that deadline will just add to it,’ she said.

‘We will have providers who are no longer able to staff their services safely and that can only mean they will have to be handing back contracts.

‘They will have to be looking at whether they can minimise the number of beds that they use to keep themselves open, which will have a direct effect on the NHS’s ability to discharge people out of hospital and into care settings.’

Last month president of the hospital doctors’ union the HCSA Dr Claudia Paoloni said using the ‘blunt instrument of compulsion rather than persuasion’ will put off hesitant key workers.

The health secretary is set to roll out plans to make Covid-19 vaccination a requirement for all members of NHS staff this winter

Ministers believe that mandatory jabs for all NHS workers would help restrict the spread of the virus within hospitals. (Stock image)

She said: ‘Our concern is that using the blunt instrument of compulsion rather than persuasion to ensure staff are vaccinated we could risk pushing out key NHS staff at a time when we can least afford it.

‘The government itself acknowledges the variance in vaccine take-up between employers ranging from 74 to 94 percent. We know that many hospitals have been extremely successful in persuading apprehensive staff to be vaccinated.

‘We encourage all NHS staff to be vaccinated but this is one part of a much bigger equation.

‘Covid vaccination rates in the NHS have been high for a large part of the pandemic, but experience shows we also need measures to limit transmission in the community, maintain tough infection control in hospitals and provide adequate levels of PPE and regular testing for staff.’   

The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) expressed hostility at the plans too, and raised doubts that the plans would even increase uptake.

And the NHS Confederation — which represents NHS trusts across England — said ‘the focus must remain on increasing vaccine confidence’ rather than forcing staff to take jabs.

A member of the Joint Committee for Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) — an independent body that advises the Government on vaccine policy — said making jabs mandatory would feel ‘like an admission of failure’. 

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