Cops may launch criminal probe into Martin Bashir's BBC Panorama Diana scoop if complaint is made, says Cressida Dick
3rd December 2020

POLICE could launch a criminal probe into Martin Bashir's BBC Panorama scoop on Princess Diana, Britain's top cop warned.

But Met chief Dame Cressida Dick said police hadn't yet received a complaint about Bashir's infamous 1995 interview.



Diana's brother Earl Spencer alleged Bashir showed him fake financial documents and told untrue stories about the royal family to gain access to his sister.

It's claimed the BBC journalist commissioned a graphic designer to produce two fake bank statements.

Asked about a potential criminal investigation, Dame Cressida said: "We have not received a complaint from somebody who is giving us any evidence for us to assess.

"So, if they were to, we would of course assess whether any crime has been committed or may appear to have been committed and, if so, whether it is appropriate for us to do an investigation.

POLICE COULD PROBE

"But at this stage, we have not received any such complaints."

Alan Waller — former head of security for Diana’s brother Earl Spencer — has previously said he is considering making a formal complaint to Scotland Yard against Bashir and the BBC.

Mr Waller is also considering suing Bashir and the BBC over the claims.

It is alleged Bashir ordered a graphic artist to fake bank statements which allegedly falsely suggested Mr Waller got money from newspapers and the security forces for snooping on Di.

We would assess whether any crime has been committed or may appear to have been committed and, if so, whether it is appropriate for us to do an investigation

Ex-Paratrooper Mr Waller says Bashir's claims have ruined his life.

Mr Waller told The Daily Telegraph: “Bashir has effectively stolen my identity, stolen my banking information, and used it to frame me as the fall guy.

“I am the one person in all this who can go to the police.”

BBC director general Tim Davie launched an independent inquiry into allegations the corporation used dirty tricks to clinch the landmark Panorama interview.

Lord Dyson, one of the country's most senior retired judges, has been appointed to lead the inquiry.

The inquiry's website is now online and "wishes to hear from anyone with direct knowledge of the Panorama interview and the circumstances surrounding it".

A BBC spokesman has said: "The BBC is determined to get to the truth of what happened.

"That's why we have appointed Lord Dyson to lead a fully independent investigation.

"It is vital that everyone with information shares that, so he can investigate thoroughly."

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