Dad reveals heart-breaking impact of losing his house to flash foods
2nd November 2021

Moment grandfather whose home was destroyed by flash floods recalls the heartache of losing his children’s toys ‘filled with memories’

  • Kevin Lorryman’s bungalow in Snaith almost fully submerged in flash floods
  • He and wife Catherine lost everything in February 2020 when disaster struck
  • Grandchildren’s rooms and toys were completely destroyed in catastrophe
  • Kevin talked about how ordeal impacted him in tonight’s It Takes a Flood on ITV 

A grandfather whose house was destroyed during flash floods in 2020 has revealed his heartbreak after losing precious family photos and childhood memorabilia.

 Kevin Lorryman, from Snaith, Yorkshire,  lost the bungalow her shared with his wife, children and grandchildren after it was destroyed in February 2020 by Storm Ciara.

In tonight’s It Takes A Flood, on ITV, he revealed the ordeal’s heartbreaking cost as he let the camera crew tour his now derelict home, which was unrecognisable after when the water reached 9.5 ft.

Kevin Lorryman, from Snaith Yorkshire, lost the bungalow her shared with his wife, children and grandchildren after it was destroyed in February 2020 by Storm Ciara.

In tonight’s It Takes A Floor, on ITV, he revealed the ordeal’s heart-breaking cost as he let the camera crew tour his now derelict home, which was unrecognisable after when the water reached 9.5 ft.

Speaking in the documentary, the grandfather had to fight back tears as he explained that telling his grandchildren where they belongings had gone has been ‘horrible.’ 

He added that losing the family’s memory and the children’s toys was what hit him the most.  

Archive footage showed Kevin’s house with water up to its roof.  

‘It’s the shock when you see a property that you live in flooded. It’s everything you’ve ever had in your life, and it had gone,’ Kevin explained to cameras. 

Speaking in the documentary, the grandfather had to fight back tears as he explained that telling his grandchildren where they belongings had gone has been ‘horrible.’

Kevin also shared pictures on his phone of the house filled with water, revealing that he had initially thought they would only be lightly flooded, but that two hours later, the water had filled half of their house’s lower level and kept rising.

Pictured: the bedroom of Kevin’s grandkids after it was ravaged by flooding waters, with the toys and furniture all upside down 

‘The house was built in 1971, and in all that time it had never flooded and [we] never really even thought about it flooding, and it was a lovely place to live to be fair,’ he reminisced. 

‘It was secluded, quiet. So, we loved it down here but at the moment it’s still tough even just walking in the house, it’s just a horrible place to be,’ he said. 

Kevin also shared pictures on his phone of the house filled with water, revealing that he had initially thought they would only be lightly flooded, but that two hours later, the water had filled half of their house’s lower level and kept rising. 

‘That’s the lounge that were literally two hours after we thought we’d gotten away with it,’ he said, pointing to a picture of a sofa floating on a metre-high level of water. 

Kevin then led the filming crew to a derelict children’s room, which has now been emptied from most of its contents.  

After 9.5ft of water flooded Kevin’s £200,000 house, all of the furniture piled up to the ceilling, pictured 

The master bedroom was also deep in flooding water, and the family had to salvage what they could 

Muddy, dirty water reached the whole of the house’s ground floor level. The family had to move out to a caravan 

‘There’s things still in here now, just looking at the Lego on the floor, the surrounding nerf gun bullets, as soon as you in here, I don’t want to be in here,’ Kevin said. 

‘I’m a builder, I’m supposed to be big and tough, I don’t want to touch anything here, because it’s all memories, there’s one of his cars, on the floor, even the paint in the room, the stickers on the wall, the stars on the wall,’ he said, pointing to monkey and frogs paintings around the room

‘That is what we’ve lost,’ he said, adding: ‘explaining to [his grand child] where all these things went was just horrible.’

Kevin in front of the house in 2020, with water level reaching up to the house’s roof and solar panels

As the family moved on to make a claim with their insurance following the floods, Kevin revealed the painful process of going through all the items they no longer had.  

‘The company that cleaned out, they literally itemised everything down to plates, kettles, children’s toys,’ he said. 

‘I think we ended up with 1,400 individual items we basically had to sit down and put a price to,’ he added.  

‘And for me personally it was the children’s toys, the grandkids toys that got me, I will be honest, I came in here by myself, ’cause I didn’t want anyone else in, and….’

At this time in the documentary, Kevin’s voice broke, and he had to apologise and step out of the room to collect his thoughts. 

The living-room pictured a few days after the flood’s climax, with the water reaching to the sofa

The kitchen, filled with the children toys the family tried to salvage in the aftermaths of the floods 

At the time, it was reported that Kevin and his family moved to a caravane they owned while sorting their housing situation.

The grandparents were two of hundreds of homeowners who were evacuated from 88 submerged properties in Snaith and surrounding villages following the February 2020 floods. 

The documentary followed several accounts of people who lost their homes during the floods who struck Britain between 2020 and 2021. 

Mick Renilson, whose house was flooded for the fourth time in 2020 in Hawick in the Scottish Borders, said no one could know how losing your house to a flood could feel, unless they’d experience it themselves. 

‘When I say you get over it through time, you don’t really get over it. It’s always in the back of your mind,’ he said. 

‘Every time it rains now, you’re thinking, ‘What’s gonna happen?’ No, I try and hide my emotions but inside it’s really hurting, it’s sort of killing us,’ he said. 

‘It gets you down, you could stand and cry like a wee bairn and you say, ‘Why? It’s not like it’s happened once, and it will never gonna happen again’. it’s happened four times,’ he said. 

Mick’s house was flooded in 2005, 2016, and twice in the last two years. He said it felt like being kicked while already down. 

‘We never got time to recover from the third flood that we had the fourth one,’ he said.

‘It’s like taking a hit in a boxing match and your head feels funny and you get back up and they hit you again,’ he said.

It Takes A Flood is available on ITV hub.  

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